American Mohs: A Critical Review

Title: American Mohs: A Critical ReviewArticle Type: ReviewAuthors: Brett M. Will1, MS; David J. Elpern2, MD; Roy Grekin3, MD; Douglas W. Johnson4, MD Affiliations: 1Medical Student, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC; 2Practicing Clinical Dermatologist, Williamstown, Massachusetts; 3Department of Dermatology, Clinical Professor, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, California; 4Department of Dermatology, The Queen’s Medical Center, Honolulu, HI Keywords: Basal cell carcinoma, Cost effectiveness, Economics, History, Mohs, Squamous cell carcinoma Funding Sources: NoneConflict of Interest Disclosure: None declared Capsule Summary Mohs Micrographic Surgery (MMS) is a valuable tool in the treatment of skin cancer whose indications and implementation have changed significantly since its inception Improved … Continue reading

A Monument in Hiroshima

     Ali Mahmoud1, BS, Shahzeb Hassan1, BA, Taha Osman Mohammed1, BS Leonard Hoenig2, MD Affiliations: 1. Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois 2. Private Practice, Pembroke Pines, Florida Corresponding Author: Leonard J. Hoenig, MD gooddocljh@gmail.com Conflicts of Interest Statement:  There are NO conflicts of interest. Key Words:  Hiroshima, Sankichi Toge, poetry ABSTRACT “A Monument in Hiroshima,” Japan (Figure) is dedicated to Sankichi Toge (1917-1953) a survivor of the atomic bomb blasts which occurred 75 years ago.  Toge was a poet who became the voice of the atomic bomb survivors.  This article presents highlights from Toge’s poetry that capture his vision of peace and a world free of nuclear … Continue reading

Coffee, Cutlets and the Culture of Healing

Dr. P. Ravi Shankar* Key words: India, Internship, Kerala, medical college, medical students, coffee I was disoriented in time, place and person. Events were unfolding at a rapid pace. The meeting with the Principal, the completion of admission formalities, the medical checkup in the classroom, and the allotment of rooms in the hostel. We had come back to the main square of the medical college. My father and his uncle were there with me. We decided to go to the college canteen which at that time was run by the Indian Coffee House. It was my first introduction to the venerable institution. The college canteen was a circular structure with … Continue reading

Lives Now Gone: A Nursing Home Diary

Strange is our situation here on earth. Each of us comes for a short time, not knowing why, yet sometimes seeming to a divine purpose. From the standpoint of daily life, however, there is one thing we do know: that we are here for the sake of others. Albert Einstein Lives Now Gone: A Nursing Home Diary by Dr. Robert Norman Over the last 25 years I have treated patients at dozens of nursing homes throughout Florida and taken down notes and kept a diary. Over the last few months, the urgency of my diary has been heightened due to the rampage of Covid 19. I have talked to many … Continue reading

She Did Not Know

Lymphoma could live in his skin like a creature crawling in sacred places, she thought it should be forbidden she searches online “types of lymphoma” pictures appear resembling dark mountains she asks him each morning how are you? he keeps saying he is “fine.” she’s awake until 4 am— she comes up with a plan 1. how to nurse him back to health, 2. how to save his skin. Bio: Palmer Smith is a current MFA student at Columbia University and an MA student at Middlebury College in Vermont. Her writing has been featured in Harness Magazine, Literary Yard and Thought Catalog. As a Scottish girl,  she wears 55 SPF. … Continue reading

The Surgeon’s Cap Bias

The Surgeon’s Cap Bias: Intelligence, Respect and the Enemy of Feminism By Emily Haque, BSA* Tags: feminism, gender bias, implicit bias, surgery, women in medicine On the first day of my surgical clerkship, I briskly followed my attending, a vascular surgeon, around the pre-op bay while ruminating about whether or not I was too close to him, if I should stand, if I should sit, if I should put my hair up or leave it down, or even if I should ask him a question. As he towered over me, I decided to keep quiet and avoid bothering him at all costs. I didn’t know why I was so intimidated … Continue reading

Music and Medicine: Bach Partitas on the Covid Ward

by David Elpern For almost a decade, I have used music when performing biopsies and excisions in my office. I got the idea from my friend Tim Lee, an ophthalmologist on Kauai. That led to a study published in 2014.1 Music is a simple, inexpensive aid that we use every day in my office. So, I read the article, Bedside Concerts Comforting Virus Patients by Benjamin Weiser in the May 4th, 2020 New York Times with particular interest. It features Rachel Easterwood, whose idea it was to stage concerts for Covid 19 ICU patients. Easterwood is a professionally trained musician-turned-ER physician from Columbia P&S (the same medical school that my … Continue reading

Ditching the Razor: Armpit Hair is Back!

Tayler D. Parker, BA1; Ashley E. Brown, MD1 McGovern Medical School, UTHealth Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX Corresponding author: Tayler D. Parker, BA, 6431 Fannin St, Houston, TX 77030, email Tayler.D.Parker@uth.tmc.edu, phone: 806-445-4949 Tags: beauty, behavior, shaving, medical sociology, health anxiety “Keep your man faithful and ensure home security- Shave your underarms!”. This slogan may sound comical, but it is an actual message found in underarm shaving advertisements for women as early as 1915.1 Whether shaving was driven by the emergence of sleeveless tops or by a male-driven culture, most women in the United States were shaving their armpits consistently by the 1950s for both social normativity and perceived … Continue reading

Implicit Bias in Medicine: Case Report and Literature Review

by Kory M. Johnson, Emma Fixen, David J. Elpern, Douglas W. Johnson Mount Sinai Health System, New York, NY John A. Burns School of Medicine, PGY1, Honolulu, HI David Elpern MD: The Skin Clinic, Williamstown, MA University of Hawaii School of Medicine, Honolulu, HI Keywords: implicit bias, explicit bias, immigrant, indigent, psoriasis, lymphoma, healthcare A 46-year-old Micronesian woman with history of severe disabling psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis had been our patient for many years (Figures 1 and 2). Her psoriasis started as an adolescent and had been treated with numerous therapies including topical steroids, phototherapy (sunlight exposure in Micronesia), methotrexate, cyclosporine, acitretin, apremilast, etanercept, infliximab, ustekinumab, secukinumab, ixekizumab, IL-23 blocker, … Continue reading

Anatomy of a Paper: Adalimumab and the Medical-Industrial-Academic Complex

by David J. Elpern, M.D. The Skin Clinic 12 Meadow Street Williamstown, Massachusetts djelpern@gmail.com Something is rotten in the State of Phrma Abstract: Pharmaceutical companies, clinical researchers, key opinion leaders and respected medical journals often work in concert to promote and sell new medications. The biologics are the most profitable and competitive pharmaceutical market today. Herein, I analyze the background of a publication on the biologic, adalimumab in a prominent medical periodical. This cautionary tale may guide readers when they encounter similar ghost-driven PhRMA-sponsored research. Keywords: adalimumab, key opinion leaders, hidradinitis supprativa, medical publications, ghost writing, risankizumab, disclosures, conflict of interest For some years, I had been struggling to treat … Continue reading

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...